Monday, December 21, 2009

Culinary Terminology - C

Café: French for "coffee". It is also a type of coffeehouse, prevalent in Europe, that is an odd mixture between bar and restaurant. Tired of drinking your usual coffee? Try some of these recipes! http://www.robinsfyi.com/food/coffeerecipies.htm

Canard: French for "duck". Rendered duck fat has a smoke point of 375F, and is a much treasured fat in the chef's kitchen. Here's a great recipe for duck legs! http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/pacificnw/2005/0206/taste.html

Carême: Marie-Antoine Carême, known as the "cook of kings and the king of cooks". Read up on him and his major influence on today's cuisine in your "On Cooking book", page 6.

Chef: the chief of the kitchen, a culinary expert, and a title of respect. But let him tell you himself: http://www.culinary-yours.com/whatsachef.html

Chef de partie: station chef. This job opening explains the requirements for a chef de partie: http://www.markwarner-recruitment.co.uk/winter/chefs/chef_du_partie

Chiffonade: a small chopped pile of thin strips of an ingredient such as leafy vegetables or herbs: http://www.ibiblio.org/expo/restaurant/techniques/chiffonade.html

Chinois: an extremely fine meshed conical sieve used for straining soups and sauces to produce a very smooth texture. For a picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinoise_(utensil)

Commis: an entry-level or apprentice position in the kitchen, usually under the chef de partie, and a great way to find out if this is what you want! http://www.cookingschools101.com/commis-chef.aspx

Concassée: a garnish of peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes. How to make concassée, and what to do with all those seeds, skins and whatnots: http://www.chefaz.net/tomatobb.html

Confiseur: French name for those who work with or make confectionery such as petit fours, chocolates and candies: http://www.chococlic.com/chocolatiers/specialites-france/pays-de-la-loire.php
(check out the blue chocolate!)

Consommé: a clarified, rich broth. For more information on consommé, click here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consomme

Coulis: a purée sauce from vegetables or fruit, with the texture similar to a thin tomato sauce. Can be served hot or cold. An ice cream florentine with raspberry coulis: http://www.foodiesite.com/recipes/2000-02/icecrflor.jsp

Croissant: the word "croissant" means "crescent" in French. Hence the name for this crescent shaped roll. Here's a recipe: http://www.ochef.com/r203.htm

Cuisine: French for "kitchen". Can also refer to cultures, defining the ingredients, seasonings, cooking methods and styles of their foods, like the American cuisine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_the_United_States

Cuisson: literally means "cooking process" in French. In text it refers to the juices left in the pan after the cooking of meat, poultry or fish etc, but can also refer to the liquid used for shallow poaching: http://www.wiley.com/legacy/products/subject/hospitality/prochef/diagrams.html

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