Monday, December 21, 2009

Culinary Terminology - E

Émincé: sliced thin, or cut fine. Usually refers to meats (boneless), but can also be used for fruits and vegetables. Here's a great recipe with videos: http://www.discoversandiego.com/features/cheflarry/recipes/maindishes/beefdish.htm

En croute: French for "in a crust", and refers to foods wrapped in a crust and baked. Crust can be made of a variety of items such as puff pastry, salt or bread: http://www.cuisineetvinsdefrance.com/recettes.php?idRecette=51

En papillote: cooking foods in parchment paper or foil, where the food steams in its own moisture. For recipes and pictures: http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-papillote23jun23,1,2968910.story?coll=la-headlines-food

Entrée (am): the main dish, consisting usually of meat, fish, or poultry, and a vegetable and a starch. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrée

Entrée (fr): the first course served in a meal, before the main dish. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrée

Entremetier: the roles of potager and légumier into the station that prepares the vegetables, starches and sweet courses: http://www.winecountryjobs.com/articles/WhatareSpecialtyChefs.htm

Escoffier: Georges-Auguste Escoffier, who was responsible for the development of the cuisine classique. Click here for more information: http://escoffier.com/great_chefs.html

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